Tennessee artist

24 - Christina Renfer Vogel—Perceptual Painting as a contemporary culture bomb by Vivian Liddell

Christina Vogel on beauty in painting:

Mira Schor also just talks about pleasure, visual pleasure. And just thinking about like paintings that... I want to make paintings that are pleasurable.  Now, I think the thing that I have been thinking about... I don't think it's also completely unrelated to what's going on in the world. And I don't want anyone to think that I'm like just putting my head in the sand and then going to the studio and making these like beautiful paintings. In a lot of ways, I feel like these paintings which are about beauty and about embracing these like, overtly kind of feminine symbols— like flowers are just overtly feminine or have been associated with femininity—so embracing like and you know, wanting to make paintings that are beautiful and lush and like joyful even sometimes... I don't know that that has been respected historically and that has definitely been pushed into the category of paintings women make.

Read More

23 - Katie Hargrave & Meredith Lynn—Driving Ideas on Public Space and the American Landscape by Vivian Liddell

Meredith Lynn on collaboration:

Actually something that I really appreciate about working with Katie is that—seeing her work through ideas and problems in her own work and knowing that when she calls me and says “I think that you need to reexamine this idea”—knowing that she is also pushing herself through those same challenging and difficult conversations in her own work and then knowing that I can be open and vulnerable to those criticisms that she’s bringing to me because I know that she’s also bringing that to her own work. I think that’s something that we all need to strive for… is to be willing to have your mind changed. Not about everything certainly— I think we have to have certain ethics and ideas that we hold fast to—but being willing to put up any of your ideas to scrutiny, I think is really important.

Read More

11 - Amelia Briggs—Avoiding Symmetry, Thrifting Materials & Finding her own Voice as an Artist by Vivian Liddell

Amelia Briggs on Connecting with Viewers without Using Narrative:

These are simply very formal paintings. I have finally gotten to a point where I've just been able to own that in interviews or in conversations about my work. I used to try to like hide that or I would make up things that weren't necessarily true (laughs) because I would feel defensive about it. But I was finally just like, I need to be honest about that. Like these to me in a lot of ways are very formal; I'm not thinking about heavy issues necessarily when I'm making these. However, I will say then when you brought up narrative... I do think about that in my work. What am I trying to achieve with these paintings?

I really like to think of these objects that I'm making as something similar to like, you know, when you're shopping in a vintage store or something and you come across an old toy, or like baby blanket or something—maybe stained, it's like a beautiful object, it's just like kind of worn, it has all this history behind it—and this weird feeling of this connection to it, because maybe you recognize something about it from your own childhood. Or the color. Or it sparks this kind of nostalgia. But you don't know what that history is, and there's nothing clearly spelled out there. You know, there's not like a story with it...

I like to think of these as sparking some kind of recognition in the viewer.

 

Read More